Ben Greenzweig of Momentum Events on Pivoting During a Pandemic

illustration of podcast guest

Ben Greenzweig is a leading events, consulting, and business development professional whose experience includes almost two decades working with media, technology, retail, consumer goods, financial services, energy, food & beverage, defense, government, and professional services executives across the globe on a variety of topics.

On today’s episode of What’s the Factor? I sat down with Ben to discuss lessons you can’t learn in business school. We cover everything from how he started his business to what running it during COVID-19 lockdowns—and beyond—is going to be like. 

Ben:

My name is Ben Greenzweig. I am the co-founder and CEO of Momentum Event Group.

Morgan:

What do you do at Momentum Events?

Ben:

We’re a B2B events company. We produce original content and then deliver that content via live events and round tables. More recently we’re focused on webinars and virtual events with the pandemic grappling all of us right now. To sum it up: we’re an events business and a content generator.

On Pivoting the Business

Morgan:

Was it hard for you to make that pivot into a web focus with the pandemic?

Ben:

No, it actually wasn’t hard for us for a couple of reasons. When I launched the business with my co-founder (who, unfortunately, passed away a few years ago) we built the business on a completely virtual footprint back before it was trendy to do so. So the team has always been distributed. 

We’ve had a great technology infrastructure ever since, and we’re a pretty geeky company. The actual infrastructure and the way that we built the business is very much “all the latest bells and whistles.” We’ve always offered webinars and had virtual components. It was like turning on a switch and because the team was already comfortable being remotely distributed we didn’t have to do any reeducation or training. What I like to say is, “not much has changed except for everything about our core business.”

Morgan:

Especially during this time, it’s lucky that you did all of that pre-work and you’re so far ahead.

Ben:

Well, hopefully. We’re all learning to take it one day at a time, but I certainly like our chances.

Morgan:

So what made you decide to start Momentum Events? If you look back, what made you take this leap?

Ben:

I’ve been in the B2B event space for 20 years. I actually had a brief start out in politics then moved to the private sector and I worked for a couple of different event companies. The one thing that I kept noticing is that event companies don’t really treat their people very well. It came across as a highly commoditized business, with a lot of processes—very much an assembly line. 

I felt that if you could create an events business that treated people better and meanwhile you were able to run a little leaner and more agile with things like a distributed footprint that you’d be able to deliver a better product at a cheaper price and have happier employees that stay along. That was really the thought process. I have to tell you, entrepreneurialism wasn’t really in my blood. I never wanted this, funny enough. But, here I am all these years later.

Morgan:

We’re super excited to hear you’ve made it. You guys are actually a customer of ScaleFactor, which makes it even more fun for us to be here chatting today.

Ben:

ScaleFactor speaks to our need to always be technologically advanced and have the latest toys and widgets. When we were looking to make some changes with our accounting and bookkeeping, we wanted the latest toy and widget. We discovered ScaleFactor and spoke with Alex [from the ScaleFactor team]. Here we are almost two years later now.

On the First Day in Business

Morgan:

So let’s rewind again: you decide to start Momentum Events. What was your first day as a business owner like? Did you make your own coffee? Did you set an alarm? Did you work at your kitchen table?

Ben:

Oh man, I’ve got to remember back to that date? It was surreal. I’m not going to answer your question because I don’t remember but I’ll answer a different version of it. 

In hindsight, I left the old job. As a reminder, we started Momentum because I tried so hard to change the culture and mentality at the old place where I was the managing director. I tried to treat people better and have a different kind of approach towards collaboration and I was just met by wall, after wall, after wall. It was a horrifically toxic environment. 

I mean, I’m sure everyone has their stories of fighting and backstabbing but this was like a soap opera. Only when I realized that there was no way we were ever going to change the culture is when we figured let’s go ahead and start our own thing.

In hindsight, I would have liked to have taken some time off to reset my brain, but I’m a hustler always have been. When we left our last company we didn’t have a book of business because we didn’t take anything. We had to build from scratch. We hit the ground running. We got a website up ASAP and we started making phone calls reaching out to people. It went from hustle mode to hustle mode. We’ll see how it ends, but that’s the switch that we flipped on our first day in business.

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On the Stress of Then and Now

Morgan:

What kept you up at night in the beginning? What were stresses that kept you from sleeping?

Ben:

How long is this podcast? There is a normal level of stress when you start your own business. You’re responsible for your own success and your own failure. You’re flying without a net. Every decision you make has real world implications. You’re playing with live ammo. 

We had the extra crunchy ingredient of our former employer not liking us in their space, even though we were well within our legal rights to be so. They decided to take us to court. We spent the first three and a half years in litigation. On top of every level of stress, anxiety, and panic you experience running a business we had this massive legal battle that we were fighting as well at the exact same time. 

As horrible as it was, it actually forced us to innovate faster and come up with new ideas because we had bills to pay. I actually credit their aggressive litigation with a lot of the success that our company has had because we moved into areas it would have taken us years to get into but we had no choice. It turned out to be successful.

Morgan:

That is a very interesting silver lining for you to take away from that very dark cloud. What keeps you up at night now?

Ben:

Coronavirus hasn’t helped. The events business—along with restaurants and tourism—is at the tip of the spear right now. For the first time in 20 years, there is no playbook. 

I was in events pre and post Enron, pre and post dot-com, pre and post 9/11, pre and post SARS, pre and post the 2009 recession, not post (unfortunately) but pre Iraqi war, Iraqi invasion, Afghanistan war, and elections. I’ve seen everything in events up until Coronavirus and there’s no playbook right now. There is no model. We are building the model as we go along. 

We might have confidence, but there’s no way to tell what the future is going to bring. We’re very humbled by the fact that we don’t know. We can just do the best we can one day at a time and hope it works out. The pandemic and Coronavirus are the number one things that both occupy 148% of my brain.

Morgan:

It’s a wild time for no one to have a playbook and we’re all just trying to make the best of it as we go.

Ben:

I think it’s an interesting point. I often take a lot of pride about not being the smartest person in the room. That’s completely fine with me. Anyone who says they have a plan right now? It might be successful. It might not. Their plan is based upon whatever data points they can collect and their gut feeling. Because there is no roadmap for where we are right now. 

Think about my business: we have live regional events resuming in August. Will people go to an event? Will they feel comfortable? What will it look like? We have a whole plan in place for what the experience is going to look like, but are people going to be okay? Are they going to be around in a room of 50, or 100, or 300? What will the States look like? What will the federal government response look like? There are a lot of unknowns, right now.

On Planning for Unknowns

Morgan:

How are you planning for those unknowns right now? There is no playbook, right? So how do you look at events that are coming up and say, “here’s what we’re going to do. And here’s how we’re going to handle this?”

Ben:

We have really invested heavily in our digital offerings. We have webinars and we have virtual events, that are on very detailed networking platforms. We have a couple of different models of virtual events that we have coming out as well to deliver content and an experience that’s a little bit different. 

There are a small percentage of live events that we are planning to continue to host. We have reenvisioned what that experience will look like for the attendee. In the worst case scenario if attendees are uncomfortable, maybe we move the event again if we have to. 

At the end of the day, we’re not going to run an event if our stakeholders don’t feel comfortable. It would just be irresponsible of us and we’re not going to do it. We need to make sure that people are comfortable and enough individuals want to be involved. For now, I think you could probably say goodbye to receptions, handshakes, and some of the physical aspects that really make events valuable as we adjust for life right now.

Morgan:

It’ll definitely be interesting when live events get rolling again.

Ben:

That’s an understatement.

On Finding Mentors

Morgan:

Did you have mentors at first when you started off?

Ben:

I had friends and, in fact, one of them became my current business partner. He’s a great gentleman named Bryon Main, who joined two years ago when my original partner and good friend passed away, unfortunately. 

I had some friends who acted as mentors. My wife was a phenomenal confidant and partner to lean on through everything. There are always people I can trust, but there are also people I couldn’t really trust who I thought I could. These lessons really taught me the value of trying to have some confidence in your own gut and intuition. At the end of the day, there’s not a lot of people that you can count on and you have to be comfortable with making your best decisions possible.

On Intimidating Tasks Like Payroll

Morgan:

What was the most intimidating thing you had to take on as a business owner?

Ben:

Payroll! It was one thing in my last job to manage the payrolls. It’s another thing to fund the payroll. As a business owner, you’re making decisions about people’s livelihoods. Philosophically, I generally err on the side of trusting people. I have found this is not a very common trait among senior leadership across the board. 

To be honest, it might not be a good trait to have either. You have employees that work out, you have others that disappoint you, and I err on the side of trusting all those individuals. When you trust them and you’re responsible for payroll you set yourself up for some risks and some challenges. That was one of the biggest challenges that I still frankly have to this day, although I love the team I have now and they’re all working their tails off to try to keep this thing going forward. I love every one of them.

On Rebranding

Morgan:

Have you changed your business name or logo? Have you always been Momentum Events?

Ben:

We’ve always been Momentum Events. We’ve always had our logo with our swirl. It’s funny, I spent quite a bit of time early on when we launched the business thinking about colors and logos. In hindsight, it was way too much time. I didn’t even spend a lot of time on it and I still spent too much time on it. 

We occasionally change how we’re known from Momentum to Momentum Events to Momentum Events Group, but we’ve always been Momentum and I generally have no interest in revisiting my logo or my colors at any point. It is not a top value item for my time.

Morgan:

What is something that you had to learn or teach yourself on the fly?

Ben:

Oh, so much. I would say finance and bookkeeping again. My original business partner who passed was in charge of finance, operations, and marketing. I had to really understand finance overnight. 

I’m a revenue generator at heart. I’m a sales dog. So I’m really good at generating the money. I’m not so good at accounting for it. I don’t care about my chart of accounts or general ledger. I hated accounting in high school. I don’t really give a crap if it’s a debit or a credit. Just let me get the money and someone else can figure that out, please. I beg you. 

I had to learn enough to have conversations with the accountant and to keep the business going. That’s a big reason why I found ScaleFactor because I hated dealing with it. I hated my accountants pretending that I had to deal with it. Oh God, I hate accounting. God bless those who do it. God bless CFOs. That is not a life for me in any way, shape, or form.

Morgan:

It really is something that every business owner needs and none want to be, you know?

Ben:

Yes, although CPA’s are very much in demand. It’s not for me.

On Coffee and Caffeine

Morgan:

How many cups of coffee do you drink in a day?

Ben:

I have a really big Reese’s mug. So technically I justify it by saying I fill that cup twice. By non-measurable standards, it’s a two cup of coffee day. I probably push eight cups a day. That’s my guess. 

I’ve learned I don’t really have any kind of caffeine sensitivity. It doesn’t give me the jitters. It doesn’t keep me up. If I don’t have my coffee in the morning, I don’t have a headache. To me it’s just more, of a comfort drink than like “I need my coffee!” I’ve learned to live with very few things I need to get through my day.

Coffee is great. I like my coffee. If you told me I had to give up my coffee tomorrow I would be upset, but it wouldn’t impact my life that much.

On Business Advice and Passions

Morgan:

What’s a piece of business advice you received that you’ve since discovered is terrible advice?

Ben:

There’s so much bad advice out there. I wouldn’t even know where to begin to talk about the amount of bad advice that’s out there. People talk a lot about “follow your passion” and “this is my destiny.” But your passion doesn’t have to be your product. Your passion can be a job function that sells your product, or a job. Your passion can be managing people and getting the best out of your team. It doesn’t have to be a certain service.

I think passion is a very overused word. I don’t want to put you on the spot but I would ask, are you passionate about virtual bookkeeping, Morgan? (Absolutely, you are to anyone who’s listening at ScaleFactor) but deep down you might be more passionate about marketing communications and writing. 

That doesn’t mean you’re not going to be a phenomenal success at a company like ScaleFactor, but your passion can be in what you do as opposed to what you’re part of. I love creating relationships. I love building sales teams. I love working with people. Do I love the content of every event I’ve ever produced in the history of my life? No. I think passion is personal and I don’t think that one size fits all with the advice that you’re given.

Morgan:

I think that’s great advice. Passion feels a little bit like a buzz word.

Ben:

It is a buzz word. “Oh, I work at Google. I’m passionate about Google.” What are you passionate about—algorithms? No, you’re passionate about connecting customers, or creating video chat or helping identify X, Y, and Z. I know there are people who are passionate algorithms. I get it. They’re probably richer than I’ll ever be. It’s just not for me.

Morgan:

Maybe their algorithm will help them discover this podcast and they will learn so much more about themselves afterward.

Ben:

Exactly. That’s what all of our hashtags and keywords come in. So it gets down with a Boolean search term.

Morgan:

That’s where the marketing team comes in. 

On the Thrill of the Hunt

Morgan:

What do you do to celebrate?

Ben:

I don’t celebrate. I know it sounds funny. I don’t really celebrate. One of the questions I ask whenever I hire a sales person is “what do you enjoy more: the thrill of the hunt or the taste of the catch?” What I’m looking for is the thrill of the hunt people. 

To me, the celebration represents a sort of a finite ending to something. When you own your own business there’s never really an ending. You don’t close up your laptop at 5pm on a Friday and switch off until Monday. You don’t walk away Monday night at 8pm, or 6pm and call it done as a business owner. You’re always thinking about your business. I know I’m probably an outlier here but I generally don’t find celebrations to be something I seek or desire.

On Promoting Your Company

Morgan:

What do you do to help promote or grow Momentum Events?

Ben:

I’ve always believed in humanizing a business. I think some of the greatest success stories are when you humanize your business. Let’s be honest, if I emailed, called, or tweeted at you every day to attend my event you would switch off in about eight seconds. So there are things that I’m passionate about that I talk, blog, and write about. For example, mental health is something that’s extraordinarily important to me. Psychedelics are something that I find strongly important as well. I also like talking about areas that aren’t getting enough conference attention. 

There was a brief period of time in 2016 that President Obama opened up the Cuban market to U.S. Businesses. Momentum was the very first company to have a series of conferences for U.S. companies on how to do business in Cuba. We ran about 10 conferences. We went to Havana—none of this is a political statement—I just wanted to connect people with knowledge and opportunities. I was passionate about that. So I like to write and communicate about passions that I have and not just about conferences, webinars, and virtual events.

Morgan:

How was your experience in Havana like?

Ben:

It was brilliant. The two places in the world that I’ve been to (on business) where I have never been more welcomed as an American in my life were Havana, Cuba, and Northern Iraq. It’s very surprising but they were so welcoming in both places. 

There’s a whole history to each and certainly in Northern Iraq, but they utterly love Americans there. I haven’t been to 87 countries so I can’t tell you how the rest of the world is and I’m sure there are other welcoming places, but at least in my mostly European, Asian, and Central American travel experiences, those two areas were the most welcoming.

On Taking Big Risks, Bad Business Advice, and the Best Parts

Morgan:

Have you taken any big risks lately and how did they turn out?

Ben: 

Well, I don’t think there’s a bigger risk than launching a business. That’s the biggest risk I’ve taken so far in my life and the answer to how it’s turned out is unknown. I just thought of another answer to one of your earlier questions about the worst advice that I’ve heard. I’m going to flip this around but it’s going to get to the same point so humor me here. 

When you’re starting a business and you try to read as much as you can from the magazines, the articles, and the blogs every entrepreneur always seems to have it all. It’s all great. “Everything is wonderful. My valuation is XX. My revenue is XX. My growth rate is XX.” 

There is such a level of bullshit in that response because there is no possible way when you’re growing your business (unless you reach such an unbelievable minority percentage of success stories) that you’re not dealing with the same levels of stress, anxiety, and risks. 

If you don’t have a family you’re risking, “will I ever find someone and have a family?” If you do have a family, “will I provide for my family?” You’re almost forced to succumb to this level of, “well, it’s supposed to be better. Look at the CEO of this-and-that!” 

I would venture to say that 90-95% of that is just utter crap to make it look good. I was guilty of it as well during some of the hardest times with litigation. Even when the business was growing, I would overly talk about how good it is because you want to set a positive example and you want to grow your team’s confidence. It’s an unbelievable risk you’re taking on and the future is not written. I don’t know if I’ll ever take a bigger risk than launching this business and I don’t know how it will end and there’s a level of acceptance I’ve had to reach with it.

Morgan:

That’s a great answer to both questions. Thank you for circling back to the earlier one too. What’s the best part about being a business owner?

Ben:

I love not answering to anyone. I think if you want to run your own business and you’re passionate about something you want to build or make you should go for it. I love the fact that I can lead by example. I can get my job done and defend my decisions. Yes, I have a business partner and I consult my leadership team. I like the fact that my experience and my track record isn’t questioned. It doesn’t mean my decisions are more or less shit than they would be but there’s a risk that your decisions might not work out anywhere. 

If you don’t have to go 10 rounds defending your experience, book of business, and your track record to present the facts it just takes so much stress out of your life. If there’s one thing that this whole pandemic has shown everybody—certainly me—it’s that at the end of the day so much just doesn’t matter. Life is too damn short and too precious. 

If you’re spending your time defending your integrity and defending your experience: change your venue. That’s a big regret that I have. I should’ve left my last company earlier. I should have left them years earlier but I didn’t realize how toxic it was until I got out of there. And life is short. That’s really the key takeaway.

On His Business Advice

Morgan:

What is your advice for new business owners or people who are getting ready to jump in for the first time?

Ben:

Prior to COVID-19, I might have a couple of different thoughts about this. I think Mark Cuban said recently that he thinks the next generation of life-changing businesses will be formed as a result of this pandemic. Prior businesses were formed in the wake of the great recession, just as prior businesses emerged out of the ashes of the dot-com bust. 

He’s not wrong. I think that if you’re looking to start a business now, it is so hard to future cast what the world is going to be. It’s very easy to get caught up in these macro statements and not take a moment to actually evaluate them on their own merit. So for example, after 9/11, and again after the great recession, a lot of the conversation in my industry was “people will never feel safe meeting again. People will not get on a plane. No one’s going to travel. No one will ever have budget or events or round tables or meetings or festivals. No one’s ever going to want to do that again.” 

Now technology has come so far, you can do a lot more at home, but it doesn’t really replace human interaction. I admit all this might be a little self-serving because I’m in the events business, but it applies to tons of industries. I think there’s a reason why humans left the cave. 

We left the cave because we are explorers by nature. We need connection. We need interaction. I don’t think any amount of technology will ever suppress our innate need to be social creatures. If you read a lot of what’s going on right now, it’s “the future is local” and “travel and restaurants will never look the same again. It’s always going to be partitions and food delivery. That’s the future!” 

Sure, everyone’s gonna have Netflix and there’s going to be leftover elements of this but I don’t buy into most of that talk. I would encourage those that want to start a business to think about the minority opinion and see if you believe in that minority opinion. That’s the tether you should grab onto when starting your business.

Morgan:

You’re suggesting you should look for the smallest voice that you can pick out of the crowd because there are probably more of them?

Ben:

There definitely are more of them. The problem is you also get groupthink and then you move into mob mentality. I’m not implying all mobs are good or bad—that’s irrelevant. It’s very easy for people who are scared, have job instability, don’t have a job, or have less of a paycheck to say “the world’s never going to look the same.” 

When you’re in the middle of the fog, it’s very foggy. It’s important to know that there is a pathway out and that pathway will be the minority opinion. That’s the opinion you might want to spend more time researching and looking into.

Hot Takes

Morgan:

We are going to wrap up with some hot takes. First up: whiteboards, yay or nay? Love them or hate them?

Ben:

Love them. But only if I use them myself. You should never be sharing your whiteboard on screens or with other people. Because no one is going to follow your line of thinking.

Morgan:

Are you a morning person or a night owl?

Ben: 

Oh my God. I’m a morning person. You want me anywhere at 3 am, I am there—smiling with bells on. You want me to go anywhere at 9:30 pm? Good luck. I’ve been like that for years, not just in my forties or lately.

Morgan:

Microsoft or Google Suite?

Ben:

Google, by far and away.

Morgan:

What was your first job?

Ben:

First job ever? I had my first job when I was five years old. I sold seedlings from a maple tree outside my house for a penny a seedling. In the Northeast we called them poly noses because you would take your fingertips and pry open the end of the seedling and then stick it on your nose like a poly nose. 

I would sell them for a penny each. I think I sold seven of them and these were from a tree that everyone had in their yard. So I guess I should have known then I was an entrepreneur. Then my first W2 job was a stock boy at a pharmacy. My first real job out of college I worked in community relations for a New York state Senator.

Morgan:

So from selling seeds to planting them, there you have it. The last book that you read?

Ben:

Trust Surrender Receive by Anne Other.

Morgan:

How was it?

Ben:

Life-changing.

Morgan:

Well, that’s an excellent review. The last show that you binge watched?

Ben:

Well, I have three children so I don’t have the luxury of sitting down and binge watching anything. If you’ll permit me to widen the definition of binge watching to include watching two episodes back to back of something, I will say Ozark. We’re up to season 3 right now.

Morgan:

I binge watched that and finished it in a day because I don’t have children.

Ben:

Don’t tell me how season 3 ends, okay? Don’t tell me.

Morgan:

I won’t tell you. I will just tell you that it’s very good. Wendy is serving a lot of Walter White and Breaking Bad vibes and I appreciated it.

Ben:

I’m a big Walter White fan. Not to get track from the hot takes, but there is a major downside to binge watching. Which goes back to my cave comment. I don’t mean to sound like a boomer and I’m not a boomer, so you can’t “okay, Boomer” me. What I’m about to say will come across a little “okay, Boomer” and I admit that. My 14-year-old says it to me, I get it. 

There used to be this joy of discovery and anticipation in television. “Come back next week and see what happens to Marty Bird” which you just don’t have because—boom! Now it starts up the next episode right away. You get all this instant consuming of media but you kind of lose some of that edge-of-your-seat waiting. I’m not saying it’s good or bad, but I think when you’re greatly anticipating something it might make it a little bit more fulfilling. Whereas if you can just literally watch the next episode? Anyway, there’s my big Gen Y comment.

Morgan:

[laughter] Well, enjoy your view of us from up on your soapbox.

Ben:

Exactly. It’s a very, very small soapbox with lots of holes.

Morgan:

What’s a new product you purchased recently?

Ben:

I bought Sunday lawn care. I don’t know if you know Sunday lawn care.

Morgan:

I also have Sunday lawn care. Yes. I love them!

Ben:

I love my Sunday lawn care. They got an aerial shot of my backyard. It’s like $140 for the whole year. I don’t mind adding it to my hose. I do my treatments and I do my pet fixes beause I’ve got two dogs that tear up my lawn. So far, I’ve been very happy with the product. So shout out to Sunday!

Morgan:

What a fun free ad that they’re getting from both of us, right?

Ben:

Exactly. Sunday: when you want to trust your fertilizer to the company that cares think of Sunday. I wonder if they named it Sunday because it’s the first day of the week? There was some marketing there that said “start your week with Sunday” Or “Sunday’s the day you do lawn care.” I’d like to find that out.

Morgan:

We’ll tweet at them and I’ll report back what I find out.

Ben:

I’m getting extra old at this point but there was a time where some group of consultants (I think it was PWC) back in 2002 or 2004, were going to spin off their consulting division and their name was going to be Monday. 

Theoretically, if that existed, you’d have Sunday lawn care, Monday consultants. Anyone who gets the reference of Happy Days. [singing] “Sunday, Monday, happy days!” You’d build the company on the Happy Days theme song, then you’d have to get some great joint venture agreement between Sunday, Monday, and Happy Days. The marketing would literally write itself for anybody over the age of 58. It would be brilliant.

Morgan:

What is your most annoying workplace habit?

Ben: 

I know this is annoying and I try very hard to not do it. But by being virtual, you can’t just tap on someone’s shoulder and say, “Hey, Susie, I have a question.” Since we’re remote I have to just ping them. “Hey, got a minute?” 

I’ve come to realize that when you’re in a position of leadership and you ask someone randomly if they have a minute, it raises the hackles and might give them a little bit of anxiety. I don’t ever want to do that. I’ve learned to put some contextual reference in my messages. “Hey Morgan, I have a quick question about that podcast next week.” 

That’s my annoying habit that I recognized and I’ve tried to change. On the flip side, something that annoys me is joining video calls with your video off. Do not video conference, meet, or join a video call with your video off. I have no interest in seeing your static picture. 

Unless you physically have a problem with your camera we are already isolated enough. Show your face. I don’t care about your background or your couch or your dog or your kid. It’s life. Don’t join a company meeting with your video off. That annoys me.

Morgan:

It also helps so that you’re not cutting each other off. When you can see that the other person is—

Ben:

That’s exactly right.

Morgan:

—about to talk.

Ben:

It would be funny if we kept on—

Morgan:

[laughter] Oh, this is a good joke. 

Ben:

—cutting you off. [laughter] Going back to human connection, that’s the whole point. By not seeing other people you also don’t pick up on nonverbal tells. It’s another reason for coming out of the cave, human involvement, et cetera. But yes, I’m with you on the “not cutting people off” as I cut you off.

Morgan:

What is your favorite book?

Ben: 

Michael Pollan’s How to Change Your Mind.

Morgan:

If you’ve got to pick one word, what’s the factor?

Ben:

God, this is not a question I anticipated. Balance. It’s important to find balance in every element of your life and not work/life balance. Balance in work, balance in life, balance in the components that make up your life. Balancing your needs, your partner’s needs, your friend’s needs, and your kids’ needs. It’s balancing your needs, your wants, and what’s possible. 

What’s the factor? It’s balance.


Thanks for joining us for this episode of What’s the Factor? If you’d like to learn more about our guest Ben Greenzweig, Momentum Events, or ScaleFactor please visit our websites. We’ll see you soon for our next episode.

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